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The city of Austin, Texas, is now considering changing its name. Austin’s Equity Office suggested renaming the city after discovering its namesake, Stephen F. Austin, “opposed an attempt by Mexico to ban slavery in the province of Tejas and said if slaves were freed, they would turn into ‘vagabonds, a nuisance, and a menace,’” according to the NY Post.

Steven Austin is known as the “father of Texas” and drew the state’s early borders. He was even the Secretary of State for the short-lived independent Republic of Texas (Sam Houston was the President).

According to the NY Post

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The city of Austin, Texas, could be headed for a name change because of founder Stephen F. Austin’s pro-slavery stance, according to a report recently drafted by officials.

The state capital’s city council is considering renaming dozens of streets, parks, monuments and landmarks with ties to the Confederacy.

The city name itself is included in that list – which designates it as “not directly tied to the Confederacy and/or the Civil War but within the spirit of the resolution representing slavery, segregation, and/or racism.”

Stephen F. Austin, known as the “Father of Texas,” fought to defend slavery and saw it as vital to the city’s sugar and cotton production, says the report published last week by the city’s Equity Office [when Texas was part of Mexico. He also opposed Mexico’s attempt to ban slavery].

He “believed that if slaves were emancipated they would turn into ‘vagabonds, a nuisance and a menace,’ wanted slaveowners to be compensated if their slaves were emancipated,” the report notes, citing the 1926 book “The Life of Stephen F. Austin” by Eugene Barker.

The Austin city name is up for “secondary review,” meaning it requires “more analysis” by council members.

The change would require an election since “Austin” would have to be erased from the city’s charter. And if Austin Texas has to change its name what about:

  • Arlington Texas which was named after Robert E. Lee’s estate in Virginia?
  • What about Lubbock Texas, named after Thomas Saltus Lubbock who was a Colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War?
  • Odessa, Tx was named after the city in Ukraine, but in the late 19th century as part of Russia, the Cossacks committed massacres against the Jews in Odessa.
  • Tyler Texas was named after John Tyler the 10th POTUS, he owned thirteen slaves and didn’t believe that Congress had the right to limit slavery.
  • Bryan Texas was named after William Joel Bryan who fed Confederate troops stationed at the mouth of the Brazos at his own expense.
  • And let’s not forget to rename Palestine, Texas for obvious reasons.

But for now the PC crazies are only going after Austin, what would the city’s new name be?

According to the Daily Wire:

The Equity Office has met with a host of opposition, with most suggesting the progressive department is trying to whitewash Austin’s history. The Equity Office responded by saying that the time has come to make changes.

“It is essential to acknowledge that societal values are fluid, and they can be and are different today compared to when our city made decisions to name and/or place these Confederate symbols in our community,” they noted, adding that, when the markers were placed and the streets named, residents of color weren’t given a say in the process.

How about naming it “Lincoln,” Texas?  Or even better, “Lidblog.com” Texas?

Perhaps the best name would be “We Bow Down To The PC Police,” Texas.

H/T ConservativeFiringLine

 

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