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Remember Sandy Berger? He is the former Clinton aide that stole documents from the National archives.

Berger and his lawyer said Monday night he knowingly removed the handwritten notes by placing them in his jacket, pants and socks, and also inadvertently took copies of actual classified documents in a leather portfolio. (Fox News 7/04)

Berger’s two years of probation is over any day now but he doesn’t get back his security clearance for another year. Let me suggest that we make Sandy Berger a deal to give him back his clearance. But first he has to do a little project—he has to spend a few weeks working for the BBC.

You see the BBC is holding back on us. There is a secret report called the Balen Report, that may include strong evidence of bias against Israel in BBC news programming.

Steven Sugar, a London lawyer has fought a long and hard to get his hands on the document under Great Britain’s Freedom of Information Act. Originally the Information Commissioner, Richard Thomas, originally backed the BBC’s decision to block access to the report but the Information Tribunal later ruled in Mr Sugar’s favor last August.

Mr Sugar said recently that he did not know whether the information contained in the report was significant but “instinct says that if they don’t want to give it to me it may be important”. The report, which examines hundreds of hours of BBC radio and television broadcasts, was compiled by Malcolm Balen, a senior editorial adviser, in 2004. The BBC said it was intended as “an internal review of programme content, to inform future output” and was never intended for publication. A spokesman for the BBC said it is “asking the High Court to reconsider the Information Tribunal’s decision that Mr Balen’s review was covered by the Freedom of Information Act because it is very important that it obtains clarification from the courts about the extent to which the Act applies”. Monica Carss-Frisk, QC, representing the BBC, told Mr Justice Davis that the tribunal was wrong to grant Mr Sugar access to the document. Ms Carss-Frisk also said that the Information Tribunal did not have jurisdiction to hear Mr Sugar’s appeal under the terms of the Freedom of Information Act (Source: Times Online)

I believe in America we call that a legal loophole.So where does Mr. Berger fit into all of this? All we have to do is to send him to work for the BBC with baggy pants and socks. We give him Carte Blanche to take whatever he would like BUT he has to get us that Balen report. Sandy is the guy—he has the experience in stealing documents and he has the incentive, we will get him back his security clearance. Its a win-win for everyone. Well, except for the BBC, because we will have the solid evidence that they are trying to hide, their willful bias against Israel. Their journalistic reputation will be right where it belongs—in the toilet.

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