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For the past week, President Bush has been on what some people have called a “farewell-reconciliation tour of Europe. Apparently he wants to make “nicey” with the Europeans that have spent so much of their time, criticizing the war on terror. President Bush even went so far as to say that he regretted his cowboy-like speech after 9/11 when he said that he wanted to get Osama “Dead or Alive.”

Despite all of their criticism of the US President, Natan Sharansky says that we shouldn’t be surprised if Europe begins to sound like George Bush did in late 2001. Europe is all about assimilation. They frown on any group that refuses to “Europeanize” themselves. But as European governments continue to turn a blind eye toward underage marriage, genital mutilation and honor killings, the “intellectual” world is beginning to turn their attention toward the European Muslim community and wondering why they won’t become more “European”. Sharansky say that a movement against “Dhimmitude” will result. I hope he is right. Read more of Natan Sharansky’s piece below:


Democracies Can’t Compromise on Core Values
By NATAN SHARANSKY

June 16, 2008

As the American president embarked on his farewell tour of Europe last week, Der Spiegel, echoing the sentiments of a number of leading newspapers on the Continent, pronounced “Europe happy to see the back of Bush.” Virtually everyone seems to believe that George W. Bush’s tenure has undermined trans-Atlantic ties. There is also a palpable sense in Europe that America will move closer to Europe in the years ahead, especially if Barack Obama wins the presidential election. But while Mr. Bush is widely seen by Europeans as a religious cowboy with a Manichean view on the world, Europe’s growing rift with America predates the current occupant of the White House. When a French foreign minister, Hubert Védrine, declared that his country “cannot accept a politically unipolar world, nor a culturally uniform world, nor the unilateralism of a single hyper power,” President Clinton was in the seventh year of his presidency and Mr. Bush was still governor of Texas. The trans-Atlantic rift is not the function of one president, but the product of deep ideological forces that for generations have worked to shape the divergent views of Americans and Europeans. Foremost among these are different attitudes toward identity in general, and the relationship between identity and democracy in particular. To Europeans, identity and democracy are locked in a zero-sum struggle. Strong identities, especially religious or national identities, are seen as a threat to democratic life. This is what Dominique Moisi, a special adviser at the French Institute of International Relations, meant when he said in 2006 that “the combination of religion and nationalism in America is frightening. We feel betrayed by God and by nationalism, which is why we are building the European Union as a barrier to religious warfare.” This attitude can be traced back to the French Revolution, when the forces fighting under a universal banner of “liberty, equality and fraternity” were pitted against the Church. In contrast, the America to which pilgrims flocked in search of religious freedom, and whose revolution amounted to an assertion of national identity, has been able to reconcile identity and freedom in a way no country has been able to match. That acute observer, Alexis de Tocqueville, long ago noted the “intimate union of the spirit of religion and the spirit of liberty” that was pervasive in America and made it so different than his native France. The idea that strong identities are an inherent threat to democracy and peace became further entrenched in Europe in the wake of World War II. Exponents of what I call postidentity theories – postnationalism, postmodernism and multiculturalism – argued that only by shedding the particular identities that divide us could we build a peaceful world. Supranational institutions such as the EU, the International Court of Justice and the United Nations were supposed to help overcome the prejudices of the past and forge a harmonious world based on universal values and human rights. While these ideas have penetrated academia and elite thinking in the U.S., they remain at odds with the views of most Americans, who see no inherent contradiction between maintaining strong identities and the demands of democratic life. On the contrary, the right to express one’s identity is seen as fundamental. Exercising such a right is regarded as acting in the best American tradition. The controversy over whether Muslims should be able to wear a veil in public schools underscores the profound difference in attitudes between America and Europe. In Europe, large majorities support a law banning the veil in public schools. In the U.S., students wear the veil in public schools or state colleges largely without controversy. At the same time severe limits are placed on the harmless expression of identity in the public square, some European governments refuse to insist that Muslim minorities abide by basic democratic norms. They turn a blind eye toward underage marriage, genital mutilation and honor killings. The reality is that Muslim identity has grown stronger, has become more fundamentalist, and is increasingly contemptuous of a vapid “European” identity that has little vitality. All this may help explain why studies consistently show that efforts to integrate Muslims into society are much less effective in Europe than in America, where identity is much stronger. Regardless of who wins in November, the attitudes of Americans toward the role of identity in democratic life are unlikely to change much. Relative to Europe, Americans will surely remain deeply patriotic and much more committed to their faiths. Europeans, meanwhile, may move closer to the Americans in their views. The recent shift to the right in Europe – from the victory of conservative leaders like Angela Merkel, Nicolas Sarkozy and Silvio Berlusconi to the surprise defeat of the leftist mayor of London, Ken Livingston – might partially reflect a belated awareness there that a unique heritage is under assault by a growing Muslim fundamentalism. The logic of the struggle against this fundamentalist threat will inevitably demand the reassertion of the European national and religious identities that are now threatened. Europeans are now saying goodbye to Mr. Bush, and hoping for the election of an American president who they believe shares their sophisticated postnational, postmodern and multicultural attitudes. But don’t be surprised if, in the years ahead, European leaders, in order to protect freedom and democracy at home, start sounding more and more like the straight-shooting cowboy from abroad they now love to hate. Mr. Sharansky, a former Soviet dissident, is chairman of the Adelson Institute for Strategic Studies at the Shalem Center in Jerusalem. He is the author, most recently, of “Defending Identity: Its Indispensable Role in Protecting Democracy” (PublicAffairs).

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