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Boy oh boy, that religion of peace certainty has a great sense of justice. Especially the Wahhabi version of Islam practiced in the Saudi Kingdom.

Saud Bin Abdulaziz Bin Nasir al Saud, 34, who is a grandson of Saudi Arabia’s King Abdullah, is accused of killing Bandar Abdullah Abdulaziz in a top London hotel on February 15 after abusing him for months. The prince was videotaped kicking and punching Bandar Adulaziz on an elevator at the Landmark Hotel, where the two were living. Bandar is seen cowering in the corner; three weeks later, his battered body was discovered in the prince’s bed.

And there’s the proverbial rub. Although he is being tried in British Courts, he better not go home to the Kingdom.  Because Bandar Adulaziz was found in the Prince’s bed it led to speculation about the Prince’s sexuality, and in the warped Wahhabi version of justice,royalty who beats a servant to death does not get the death penalty, but one who is a homosexual, well that is a different story.

A Saudi prince accused of murdering his servant in Britain could face the death penalty in his homeland over allegations of homosexuality, a London court heard on Friday.

The prosecutor spent much of the first day of the prince’s murder trial yesterday attempting to establish his homosexuality. The “fact of his sexuality would ordinarily be of absolutely no relevance to a criminal trial, but in this case it is clear that the defendant’s abuse of Bandar was not confined simply to physical beatings,” said the prosecutor. The February night Bandar died, the prince ordered champagne and six shots of Sex on the Beach before the two retired to their room, where a guest reported hearing angry voices, falling furniture and a “dull thud.” Bandar was found dead the next day. The prince claimed he had been mugged.

Prosecutor Bobbie Cheema told England’s Old Bailey central criminal court: “Homosexuality is illegal in Saudi Arabia and carries the death penalty which is still applied in some cases.

“The country in which any alleged acts took place would have little bearing on the likelihood of prosecution as the Saudi legal system is based on the sharia law which is considered to be universal.”

She said prosecution would be a matter for the Saudi authorities but can depend on the wishes of the person’s family. Some relatives push for the harshest penalty if they are deemed to have shamed the family, she said.

Interesting priorities in the Saudi Kingdom, when the Prince finally goes home he will not face charges because he killed his servant, a Saudi national, but he may face charges because he had a gay love affair with the servant.

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