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OK Democrats, stick this in your pipe and smoke it. According to a Rasmussen Poll released today, TWO-THIRDS OF ALL AMERICANS SUPPORT OFFSHORE DRILLING, including 55% of all Democrats. This particular poll comes out only five days after Queen Nancy the Most Powerful Woman in the World Decided to block an effort to begin drilling.

The plan was to only drill a minimum of 50 away from the shore. The Bill’s Sponsor Rep. John Peterson, R-Pa, told Fox News:
“There is no valid reason for Congress to keep the country from energy resources it needs.”… “I’m disappointed. I did not expect a partisan vote today. I felt we had a chance of winning this. A lot of Democrats have been talking favorably about my amendment. They know we have to do something. But today was an absolute show of Pelosi power, it was dealt from the top down,” Peterson said later, speaking with FOX News, adding he was open to other energy solutions, including wind and solar power.

These Democratic goof balls keep putting party politics ahead of the United States of America and they should ALL be voted out of office so we can get on with the business of America. Read the full poll results below:

67% Support Offshore Drilling, 64% Expect it Will Lower Prices
Tuesday, June 17, 2008

Most voters favor the resumption of offshore drilling in the United States and expect it to lower prices at the pump, even as John McCain has announced his support for states that want to explore for oil and gas off their coasts.

A new Rasmussen Reports telephone survey—conducted before McCain announced his intentions on the issue–finds that 67% of voters believe that drilling should be allowed off the coasts of California, Florida and other states. Only 18% disagree and 15% are undecided. Conservative and moderate voters strongly support this approach, while liberals are more evenly divided (46% of liberals favor drilling, 37% oppose).

Sixty-four percent (64%) of voters believe it is at least somewhat likely that gas prices will go down if offshore oil drilling is allowed, although 27% don’t believe it. Seventy-eight percent (78%) of conservatives say offshore drilling is at least somewhat likely to drive prices down. That view is shared by 57% of moderates and 50% of liberal voters.

Nearly all voters are worried about rising gas and energy prices, with 79% very concerned and 16% somewhat concerned.

McCain is expected to formally call today (Tuesday) for the lifting of the federal moratorium on states being allowed to explore off their coasts for oil and gas deposits. While acknowledging it is only a short-term response, he has described it as a good first step toward reducing U.S. energy dependence on overseas sources.

The Outer Continental Shelf moratorium, passed in 1981, bans exploration for offshore natural gas and oil deposits. Barack Obama, McCain’s opponent for the White House, voted against an effort to lift the ban last year in the Senate. He argued that it was only a short-term solution. National Democratic Party leaders and most environmental organizations for years have strongly opposed efforts to explore for oil off the coast of the U.S.

According to the new survey, 85% of Republicans are in favor of offshore drilling as opposed to 57% of Democrats and 60% of unaffiliated voters. Those who call themselves conservatives favor such drilling 84% to 46% of liberals and 59% of self-designated moderates.

African-American voters are less supportive of such drilling than whites – 58% to 71%.

Women are more skeptical than men about the impact such drilling will have on gas prices: Nearly one out of three male voters (32%) say prices are very likely to go down, a view shared by only 23% of women.

Four out of five Republicans (79%) think prices are likely to fall thanks to offshore drilling, a view shared by only 55% of Democrats. Sixty percent (60%) of unaffiliated voters expect it to happen.

Voters also believe 61% to 22% that oil companies should be required to reinvest at least a portion of their profits into alternative energy research. On this question, liberal and moderate voters are strongly supportive of the proposal while conservatives are more evenly divided (47% of conservatives in favor, 35% opposed)

Data released yesterday showed that Americans believe developing new energy sources is the best long-term solution to the nation’s energy problem. Forty-seven percent (47%) said private companies were more likely to solve the nation’s energy problem than government research programs. But, at the same time, only 52% said companies should be allowed to keep the profits from the discovery of any alternative fuel sources.

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Toplines – Oil Drilling – June 13, 2008

Toplines: Oil Drilling Survey of 1,000 Likely Voters June 13, 2008 1)How concerned are you about rising gas and energy prices? 79% Very concerned 16% Somewhat concerned 4% Not very concerned 1% Not at all concerned 0% Not sure 2) In order to reduce the price of gas, should drilling be allowed in offshore oil wells off the coasts of California, Florida, and other states? 67% Yes 18% No 15% Not sure 3) Should drilling for oil be allowed 50 miles off the U.S. coasts? 64% Yes 18% No 20% Not sure 4 If offshore oil is allowed, how likely is it that the price of gas will go down? 27% Very likely 37% Somewhat likely 21% Not very likely 6% Not at all likely 8% Not sure 5 Should the federal government pass laws requiring oil companies to use a significant portion of their profits searching for alternative sources of energy? 61% Yes 22% No 17% Not sure

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