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According to the latest installment of the annual ADL poll of key European countries.  The long held anti-Semitic stereotypes are still widely held in the European mindset. The opinion survey questioned 3,500 adults – 500 in each of the seven European countries – Austria, France, Hungary, Poland, Germany, Spain and the United Kingdom – conducted December 1, 2008 – January 13, 2009, found 31% of the respondents across Europe blame Jews in the financial industry for the current global economic crisis. (Man oh Man, I must have missed another memo from the Worldwide Jewish Conspiracy)

Respondents across the continent were asked a series of indicator questions representing the most pernicious notions of anti-Semitism and whether or not they thought the following  statements were “probably true” or “probably false”:
• Jews are more loyal to Israel than to this country.
• Jews have too much power in the business world.
• Jews have too much power in international financial markets.
• Jews still talk too much about what happened to them in the Holocaust.
• The Jews are responsible for the death of Christ
• If their opinion of Jews was influenced by actions taken by the State of Israel and whether they believed the violence directed against European Jews was a result of anti-Jewish feelings or anti-Israel sentiment.

The findings are frightening, they show:

  •  Overall, nearly half of those surveyed in the seven countries believe that Jews are more loyal to Israel than to their own country. A majority of respondents in Germany, Poland and Spain believe that this statement is “probably true;” in Spain, it is 64%.
  • High levels of those surveyed across Europe still believe the traditional anti-Jewish canard that “Jews have too much power in the business world.” Overall, nearly 40% of all respondents believe this stereotype to be true; in Hungary it is 67%.
  • Similarly, European respondents still adhere to the notion that “Jews have too much power in international financial markets.” Overall, 41% of those surveyed cling to the traditional stereotype; in Spain it is 74%.
  • Large portions of the European public continue to believe that Jews still talk too much about what happened to them in the Holocaust. Overall, 44% of those surveyed believe it is “probably true” that Jews still talk too much about the Holocaust. A majority of respondents in Austria, Hungary and Poland believe it to be true. (gee feeling a bit GUILTY guys?)
  • Overall, 23% of those surveyed continue to blame Jews for the death of Jesus.
  • Overall, 23% of those surveyed say that their opinion of Jews is influenced by the actions taken by the State of Israel. Of those whose opinions are so influenced, 58% say that their opinion of Jews is worse as a result of the actions taken by Israel.
  • In the seven European countries polled, 38% of those surveyed believe that violence directed against Jews is a result of anti-Jewish feelings, while 24% believe it is a result of anti-Israel sentiment. Hungarian and Polish respondents are most likely to believe that anti-Jewish sentiment is the reason behind violence directed against Jews in their countries. Spain is the only country in which more respondents (38%) cited anti-Israel sentiment as opposed to anti-Jewish feelings (26%) as the main cause of the violence directed against Jews.
  • Overall, 57% of respondents believe that their government is doing enough to ensure the safety and security of its Jewish citizens. Austrian and German respondents are most likely to think that their government is providing enough protection for its Jewish citizens, while more than a quarter of respondents in Hungary and Poland do not believe their government is providing enough protection for its Jewish citizens.
  •  The survey showed that despite the complexities of the current global economic environment, Jews receive a disturbing amount of blame for the financial crisis. Overall, 31% of respondents across Europe blame Jews in the financial industry either “a great deal,” “a good amount” or “a little” for the global financial meltdown. (If they really believe that, they should be worried that we would turn off their cash cards)

Now you want to know why Europe still supports terrorist groups such as Hamas? Maybe the above has something to do with it.  If you want to see the full results. CLICK HERE.

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