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Progressive politicians and organizations of the progressive persuasion argue that making people prove their eligibility to vote, will suppress voter turnout, especially in the minority community. But the only minority who will be disenfranchised will be people who have no legal right to vote, have already voted elsewhere, or who are dead.

The progressive contention is there are no real examples of voter fraud so any ID laws are unnecessary. There were numerous examples of voter fraud by ACORN during the 2008 election. For something more recent, examine these statistics presented by the North Carolina State Board of Elections to their State’s Joint Legislative Elections Oversight Committee:

  • 765 voters with an exact match of first and last name, DOB and last four digits of SSN were registered in N.C. and another state and voted in N.C. and the other state in the 2012 general election.
  • 35,750 voters with the same first and last name and DOB were registered in N.C. and another state and voted in both states in the 2012 general election.
  • 155,692 voters with the same first and last name, DOB and last four digits of SSN were registered in N.C. and another state – and the latest date of registration or voter activity did not take place within N.C. These findings only take into account data from the 28 states who participated in the 2014 Interstate Crosscheck, leaving out potential voter error and fraud in the 22 states that do not participate in the consortium.

Additionally, during an audit of death records from the Department of Health and Human Services, the Board discovered:

  • 50,000 new death records that had not previously been provided to the State Board of Elections.
  • 13,416 deceased voters on the voter rolls in October 2013.
  • 81 deceased voters that had voter activity after they died.

The concept of one-man, one-vote is essential to the freedoms of the
American Republic. Allowing people to vote more than once, or allowing
people to vote who by law don’t have that right, partially
disenfranchises those Americans who are legally voting including minorities. The weight of
the legal votes is watered-down by the inclusion of illegal votes. I
would argue that protecting the concept of one-man, one-vote should be a
top priority of our government and not protecting that right is racist.

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