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Depending on which progressive you listen to Obamacare is going to cover anywhere from 20-40 million people who never before had insurance. According to a report in the Wall Street Journal only 11% of the people who signed up for Obamacare didn’t have insurance before.

Early signals suggest the majority of the 2.2 million people who sought to enroll in private insurance through new marketplaces through Dec. 28 were previously covered elsewhere, raising questions about how swiftly this part of the health overhaul will be able to make a significant dent in the number of uninsured.

According to a survey by McKinsey and Co., only 11% of consumers who bought new coverage under the law were
previously uninsured.

The
result is based on a sampling of 4,563 consumers performed between
November and January, of whom 389 had enrolled in new insurance.

One
reason for people declining to purchase plans was affordability. That
was cited by 52% of those who had shopped for a new plan but not
purchased one in McKinsey’s most recent sampling, performed in January.
Another common problem was technical challenges in buying the plans,
which 30% mentioned.

Insurers, brokers and consultants estimate at least two-thirds of those consumers previously bought their own coverage or were enrolled in employer-backed plans.

The data, based on surveys of enrollees, are preliminary. But insurers say the tally of newly insured consumers is falling short of their expectations, a worrying trend for an industry looking to the law to expand the ranks of its customers.

About 48 million Americans were uninsured in 2012. The health law is expected to cut 25 million from that total by expanding state-run Medicaid programs and the pool of privately insured people who buy through state marketplaces, also called exchanges.

Only 11% of consumers who bought new coverage under the law were previously uninsured, according to a McKinsey & Co. survey of consumers thought to be eligible for the health-law marketplaces. The result is based on a sampling of 4,563 consumers performed between November and January, of whom 389 had enrolled in new insurance.

One reason for people declining to purchase plans was affordability. That was cited by 52% of those who had shopped for a new plan but not purchased one in McKinsey’s most recent sampling, performed in January. Another common problem was technical challenges in buying the plans, which 30% mentioned.

Health Markets Inc., an insurance agency that enrolled around 7,500 people in exchange plans, said 65% of its enrollees had prior coverage. Around 10% were dropping out of employer coverage, either because the employer stopped offering its plan or because they could qualify for subsidies on the marketplaces. Fifteen percent had previous individual plans canceled, and 40% decided to switch into coverage bought through an exchange from previous individual plans.

Even if the number is between 65% and 89% of the Obamacare enrollees having previous coverage, it still means the biggest result of Obamacare is people moving from one plan to another, and somewhere between 200 and 700k of the 2.2 million people who have signed up needed some sort of insurance before the government decided to take it over.

So please explain—-why is this failed government intrusion into our freedom the law of the land?

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